Special Guests of Harry & Megan’s

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrived in Sydney on the first flight of Qantas on October 15th and began their 16-day royal tour.

After arriving in Sydney, Prince Harry and Princess Megan of the United Kingdom stayed at the Admiralty House, the official residence of the Australian Governor in Sydney.

During the trip, two Australian health care professionals, Graeme Cooper and Danielle Kellam, received a special invitation to have lunch with Prince Harry.

What puzzles everyone is that Cooper and Kellam are ordinary medical staff.

They are neither scientists conducting medical research nor any medical discoverers that shock the world;

They‘re not high-level staff at the hospital, they don’t even have a level. 

Their true identity is just two ordinary hospital care workers!

Why can such two ordinary people be invited by the British royal family? It starts from something that happened to them a few months ago!

The two people in the photo are Graeme Cooper and Danielle Kellam.

 

They are staff members of the Australian Emergency Center.

One day, Cooper and Kellam received a mission,  to escort an old woman from her home to the hospital’s hospice department.

Graeme and Kellam knew that means the grandmother has entered the countdown stage of life, she will soon be gone…

When Grandma was taken to the ambulance by Graeme and colleagues, she looked back at her house that she had lived for a lifetime, and then said:

“Goodbye”

 

Along the way, the atmosphere inside the car was a little dignified, no one said anything more.

Graeme wanted to say something to ease this dignified atmosphere.

“Mrs. Alex, do you have any unfulfilled wishes? We hope to help you achieve this,” asked Graeme,

Unexpectedly, such a question seemed to touch the old lady, her face actually showed a bit of joy, she paused, and then said,

“I want to, go see the sea once.”

Cooper and his colleagues thought for a second and agreed, because they know, this may be the last time for her to see the sea in her life. 

So the ambulance turned around and came to a beautiful beach in Hervey Bay, Queensland.

Arriving at the destination, Graeme and colleague Danielle, pushing the bed carrying the old lady, came to the beach.

Looking at the quiet sea, the old lady suddenly became excited like a child.

“The moment she saw the sea, she was more spirited and very happy.” Cooper said.

The old lady started to talk.

“When my husband and I were young, we loved this quiet beach, we moved to Hervey Bay with a moment of impulse. I lived for a lifetime. Later, he left, and I never came back to see it.

Now, I have to go, I want to come back and see.

This place knows what I was when I was young.”

The grandmother’s hands were trembling with excitement.

Cooper had a whim and returned to the car to take out a vomit bag and put some sea water in. He wanted the old lady to feel the temperature of the sea.

“When she reached in, I could see her chest shaking, her heartbeat speeding up. Then she lay back again, closed her eyes, and her hands stopped move.”

 

“When I asked her how she felt, the old lady said to the direction of the sea, 

‘I feel calm and everything can’t be perfect anymore. ’”

 

Two days later, the old lady named Joyce passed away in the hospital.

This unforgettable experience was recorded by Cooper and uploaded to the official Facebook of QAS (Queensland Emergency Organization).

People are passing this love in their emotions. Countless people shed tears.